Posts Tagged ‘The Psychology of Socialism #4’

The Psychology of Socialism #4: The Sick-Democracy-Cycle

March 13, 2021

America’s long-developing Marxist Revolution has occurred with intermittent big gains and shorter temporary reversals, over the course of many generations.

In my Psychology of Socialism #1: Why Is It So Seductive?!, I introduced the psychological principles and elements of human nature that forever have made humans susceptible to is destructive charms.

In my second blog on this topic, The Psychology of Socialism #2: The Problems With Modernization, I addressed numerous changes that developing science and its technology have brought (I.e., increased safety and personal conveniences that have change many of our emotions, thoughts, beliefs and behaviors). Many of these changes are beneficial, but many bring distinct disadvantages to our collective well-being.

I also explained some of the ways that modernization and the Principles of Psychology can work-together to weaken a population’s resistance to the more immediate short-term rewards of socialism at the expense of certain longer-term disasters. Unfortunately, the short term rewards of socialism appeal to both voters and politicians. Without strong cultural teachings designed to “inoculate” citizens against the tyranny of many immediate rewards, many of us can fall prey to some easy rewards with disastrous delayed consequences (I.e., addictive drugs, charge card abuse, compulsive gambling, welfare dependency, or the exchange of advantageous favors and material rewards to citizens by politicians for their own increased power and tenure, etc.).

As modernizing societies continue to develop through generations of citizens, the strength and adaptive qualities of the population’s behaviors tend to diminish. The once more common population levels of tenacity and perseverance to work for long-term goals and rewards tends to decline. Also, the courage to survive hardships, based in part upon the solidifying populations’ faith in historical religions and traditions tend to also be weakened. 

In modernizing societies, people become more dependent upon the advances of knowledge, science, new technical conveniences and governmental assistance. The confluence of these many cultural changes often bring the weakening of morality and ethical behavior within the citizenry. The once sustaining rules, practices and values, historically bolstered by more powerful religious institutions with strong social, cultural and governmental support then begin to decrease in prevalence. All of this is a prelude to predictable social, political and survival problems to come.

The results of these interacting cultural changes in Democracies, or Republics such as ours, could easily transition to a positively accelerating feedback “Sick-Democracy-Cycles”. The Sick-Democracy-Cycle can be comprise of many components. For example, selfish unprincipled voters and politicians can lavish the short-term rewards they control upon each other. In other words, population votes can  be exchanged for politically controlled governmental “largess” (I.e., taxed monies confiscated from the population’s so-called “greedy maker” population and redistributed to the so-called “poor and needy taker” population). These terms become part of the emerging propagandistic language and rational for Socialism. This political Sick-Democracy-Cycle is likely to incrementally move in the direction of a Socialism. Why? Because the population behavior patterns that are punished by the removal of rewards (I.e., increasing taxes) will decrease in future frequency and the population behavior patterns that are rewarded by the receipt of rewards (I.e., various entitlements and welfare allocations) will increase in future frequency. This self-feeding political Sick-Democracy-Cycle is now in play in America’s Ongoing Socialist Revolution. If this self-destructive democracy cycle isn’t stopped, it will lead to the destruction of America, as we have known it for 244 years.

In The Psychology of Socialism 1, 2, and 3, I explained that more immediate , more frequent, and more easily accessible rewards tend to weaken the tenacity, perseverance and creative generativity of citizens. Furthermore, when these rewards become insufficient, or are suddenly cut-off, the psychological principle of Extinction kicks in. The transition from a thick source of easy rewards turns to relative deprivation. This generally leads to lower motivation (i.e., “Give-Upitis”), depression, anxiety and anger; with growing trends of many other kinds of maladaptive behaviors, including suicide, addictions , crime and aggression among citizens.

The Psychological Principle of Extinction Produced Aggression can be a catalyst to all of the of the maladaptive outcomes I have mentioned above, including citizen revolts and revolutions. Unfortunately, revolts and revolutions too often fail to illustrate the old saying that: “Good Things Can Come From Bad Things”. 

The cultural memory of our first American Revolution, occurring between 1775 and 1784, gave birth to our now badly damaged and fragile Constitutional Republic.  

As I explained in The Psychology of Socialism #3: Weakening of Our Behavioral Immunity, socialism is analogous to a disease that attacks societies when their behavioral immune systems become impaired.  I further explained some of the psychological principles that weaken populations’ resistance to the seductive short-term, damaging rewards of socialism while populations’ remain oblivious to the long-term disasters that will soon come to afflict them.

If you were born before the 1960’s you should be able to see the powerful evidence of these damaging outcomes all around you now. If so, your obvious question should be: What are the causes of these damaging changes?!

As I hope you are beginning to understand, many of the answers to this great question are found within the Scientific Field of Psychology.

Please stay tuned. There is more to come on The Psychology of Socialism and America’s present decline.

V. Thomas Mawhinney, Ph.D.

Health Services Provider in Psychology

Professor Emeritus of Psychology, Indiana University South Bend.


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