Posts Tagged ‘Paul Kennedy’

Fears of Uncontrolled Immigration and The “Tipping Point”

October 3, 2012

Fears of Uncontrolled Immigration and The “Tipping Point”

Immigration laws must control the flow of immigrants to our country and it must absolutely control the quality of the immigrants. Uncontrolled illegal immigration will be America’s ruination.

The following quote discusses a number of reality-based fears about uncontrolled immigration that have echoed through history and have to do with much more than a simple-minded dislike of, and discrimination against, foreigners.

I endorse the following passage taken from Paul Kennedys’ 1993 book, Preparing For The Twenty-First Century.

Because human beings (unlike migrating birds) require so much food, clothing, and shelter and demand many other items, migration always raises the issue of the allocation of resources. If food and land are plentiful, as in the Great Plains in nineteenth-century America, there may be less of a problem (except from the viewpoint of the Indians); if the resources are believed to be more limited, as felt in many European countries today, more migration will obviously raise the problem of providing for the immigrants. Moreover, large-scale immigration raises the fear of losing control of national boundaries and traditional sovereignty, the fear that an ethnically homogeneous or “pure” race will be altered through intermarriage, the fear not merely of foreign peoples but also of strange ways of life, religious norms, and cultural habits, of the newcomers encroaching upon the property, educational system, and social benefits owned by and largely paid for by the natives. More recently, concern has been expressed that illegal immigration into (for example) the United States is responsible for outbreaks of old and new diseases–cholera, measles, AIDS—which place a further strain upon the health-care system as well as provoking new resentments against migrants. Finally, there is always the resident population’s fear that if the immigration continues, they themselves may one day become a minority.

End Quote

V. Thomas Mawhinney, Ph.D.   8/22/10

P.S. I rediscovered this writing in my computer on 10/2/12. I cannot be sure that I  Kever used it in any context in the past. However, this quote is too good to let go to waste. The facts are that all of the concerns mentioned by Paul Kennedy, in 1993, are concerns that have actualized in America at this time.

The last fear, that an indigenous population would become a minority in their own country is one that looms large at this time and for an obvious big political reason. The Obama administration is presently doing everything in its power to retain and also to gain illegal Hispanics, as well as natural citizens, on governmental welfare programs. In this way it can advance its progressive/socialist game-plan to the tipping point comprising over 50% of the population.

Once this is accomplished, the Democratic Republic of the United States will be transformed into the Socialist Republic of the United States. All of this done while a stuporous dwindling majority watches this slowly gathering calamity move inexorably forward to engulf all that they have ever loved and cherished.

V. Thomas Mawhinney, Ph.D., 10/2/12

Rational Fears of Uncontrolled Immigration

August 22, 2010

Rational Fears of Uncontrolled Immigration

Immigration laws must control the flow of immigrants to our country and they must absolutely control the quality of the immigrants. Uncontrolled legal or illegal immigration is a catastrophe. A lack of control over the quantity and/or quality of immigration will destroy America.

The following discusses reality-based fears about uncontrolled immigration that echo through history and have to do with much more than dislike of, and discrimination against, foreigners.

I endorse the following passage taken from Paul Kennedys’ 1993 book, Preparing For The Twenty-First Century (p.41).

Because human beings (unlike migrating birds) require so much food, clothing, and shelter and demand many other items, migration always raises the issue of the allocation of resources. If food and land are plentiful, as in the Great Plains in nineteenth-century America, there may be less of a problem (except from the viewpoint of the Indians); if the resources are believed to be more limited, as felt in many European countries today, more migration will obviously raise the problem of providing for the immigrants. Moreover, large-scale immigration raises the fear of losing control of national boundaries and traditional sovereignty, the fear that an ethnically homogeneous or “pure” race will be altered through intermarriage, the fear not merely of foreign peoples but also of strange ways of life, religious norms, and cultural habits, of the newcomers encroaching upon the property, educational system, and social benefits owned by and largely paid for by the natives. More recently, concern has been expressed that illegal immigration into (for example) the United States is responsible for outbreaks of old and new diseases—cholera, measles, AIDS—which place a further strain upon the health-care system as well as provoking new resentments against migrants. Finally, there is always the resident population’s fear that if the immigration continues, they themselves may one day become a minority.

End Quote

V. Thomas Mawhinney, Ph.D. 8/22/10

From a First Class to a Second Class Power?

July 10, 2010

From a First Class to a Second Class Power?

Paul Kennedy, in his book, Preparing For The Twenty-First Century, sends us a warning from his vantage point. His book was copy written in 1993.

In my view, his warning resonates with increased authority in the year 2010.

What do you think?

Speaking of an economic slowdown that the U.S. has experienced over the past 60 years, he states the following:

Whatever the explanation for this slowdown, the consequences are serious for the United States with its internal and external obligations. With a high, fairly evenly distributed standard of living, a favorable current-accounts balance, and no foreign commitments, a country like Switzerland, perhaps, or Luxembourg, might suffer a long period of sluggish economic growth and the results, although depressing, might not be serious. But the United States is the world’s foremost military power, with commitments all over the globe; its wealth, while considerable, is unevenly distributed, resulting in immense social problems at home; it has a large current-accounts deficit and needs to borrow from foreigners. Given those circumstances, a prolonged period of slow growth compounds its existing problems, making it unlikely that the United States can continue to fund the same level of military security and attend to its social needs and repay its debts. A country where real weekly incomes have fallen steadily since 1973—as in this case—is ever less inclined to fund even the worthiest needs.

Such a dilemma is intensified if other nations are growing faster, leading to changes in economic relationships. The leading Great Power simply cannot maintain its status indefinitely if its economy is in relative decline. Moreover, because this decline is relative and gradual, it is insidious, not dramatic; as one economic historian has noted, ‘a country whose productivity growth lags 1 percent behind other countries over one century can turn, as England did, from the world’s undisputed industrial leader into a mediocre economy it is today.’ It also turned from a first-class to a second-class power. (pps.194-195)
End of Quote.

Wake-Up America!

V. Thomas Mawhinney Ph.D. 7/10/10


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