Posts Tagged ‘law of effect’

Legalized Prostitution: Sex Robots Lead the Way

January 1, 2019

Legalized Prostitution: Sex Robots Lead the Way.

Prostitution is illegal in every state in America, except Nevada. You might find it interesting to review the state and federal laws against Prostitution. Please see below.

https://prostitution.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000119

You should know that prostitution, like gambling, pornography and recreational drugs were outlawed for good reasons. They were once called “vices” because they ruin families, businesses and individual’s lives. Separately each of these legalized activities is a great cost to society that should supersede hedonistic quests for more personal pleasures. Taken together, I judge that their synergistic costs to America are, or soon will be, disastrous.

On a strongly related matter: “technological determinism” is a term used by those who wish to illustrate how advancing technology shapes the perceptions, thoughts, beliefs, emotions and behaviors of populations within civilizations. When perceptions, thoughts, beliefs, emotions and behaviors change they can spread through populations via well-known biopsychosocial scientific laws and principles.  I call these laws and principles the mechanisms of change. I call the changes they cause within populations, behavioral contagion. The effects of behavioral contagion can be good or bad for populations, cultures, and societies.

Technological determinism is only one important source of the many summating and multiplicative changes in societies that, when viewed at-large, are identified as cultural evolution. Behavioral contagion is an important component of many chains of causes (war, depletion of resources, disease, natural disasters, religion changes, technological developments, politics and more) that drive good and bad cultural evolutions. Therefore, behavioral contagion can also be an important force in the rise and decline of civilizations. Changing and even clashing subcultures can easily be observed in societies.

Unfortunate, the workings of the biopsychosocial mechanisms that drive behavioral contagion for better and for worse, are not easily observed. In fact, from what I can tell almost everyone is oblivious to them. Even most scientists that I know do not think much about their involvement in sociocultural evolution and the survival value of  societies

The video below is a perfect example, among countless others, of technological innovations that can catalyze destructive forms of behavioral contagion in America.

The following  video is only soft-pornography But, I warn you that your own imagination will rapidly convert it to XXX rated hardcore-pornography. If you are offended by this video, and your own naturally occurring imagination, I will invite you to “grow-up” and face reality. You will have to politically defend against this reality, or you and your loved ones will be hurt to varying degrees by it.

Psychology is very much at play in this robotic example of technological determinism, its resulting behavioral contagion, and also resulting cultural evolutions will likely produce . I will explain in brief.

All animals are generally influenced by the same Psychological laws and principles. One of these principles is the Law of Effect. This law states that behaviors that produces rewards for individuals will normally cause them to repeat the same behaviors more often in the future. These behavior patterns, with repeated rewarding consequences, can become deeply ingrained within the in individuals and greatly increase in future frequency. Such high rates of behaviors have, in lay language, been called “psychological addictions”. When the rewards are actually biologically addicting, both psychological and physiological addictions present concurrent problems to individuals, families, businesses, etc., and entire societies. The psychologist B. F. Skinner researched and promulgated these laws and principles he called Operant Conditioning and Learning.

Basic Laws of Association increase the likelihood that stimuli, perceptions, thoughts, beliefs, emotions and behaviors that occur together with individuals will be psychologically linked together and will be more likely to occur together more often in the future. If the stimuli are closely associated with pleasure, individuals will be more likely to be motivated to work to produce them more often in the future. Conversely, the stimuli, perceptions, thoughts, beliefs, emotions and actions are closely associated with pain or discomfort will be more likely to be escaped and avoided. Ivan Pavlov’s discovery of Classical (Respondent) Conditioning helped psychologist to understand how, for better or worse, new learned (conditioned) emotions and reflexes can be learned in humans and other animals. 

The Principle of Least Effort often leads to people and other animals seeking the least effortful ways to obtain their rewards and the least effortful ways to escape or avoid pain and discomfort. The implications for sex with robots as opposed to all that one must do to find and retain sexual partners should be clear. The more realistic the sexual robots become the more powerful their attractiveness is likely to become.

It is critically to note that behavioral scientists have demonstrated that humans and other animals are generally highly motivated get their rewards more immediately, more frequently and in larger magnitudes.  

Albert Bandura, conducted important research into the psychological field of Social Learning Theory. There are a great many social influences upon perceptions, thoughts, beliefs, emotions and behaviors the individuals within societies. These influences include all of the previous laws and principles, and more. These influences are spread through language, written words, popular media, and the imitation of other’s behaviors that are perceived in some fashion. All of this presents another level of complexity of influences upon individual’s perceptions, thoughts, beliefs, emotions and behaviors.  The principles of social learning theory present countless other avenues of behavioral contagion with good or bad effects upon individuals, cultures and societies.

All of this, and much more, is part of human and animal nature.

Historically, in Western Civilization Judeo/Christian religion’s stimuli, perceptions, thoughts, beliefs, emotions, behaviors and sacred values have militated against bad behavioral contagion. Also, Western Civilization’s, more’s, folkways and governmental laws; largely based upon these religious values, punished the spread of bad behaviors within the populations. All of this and the population’s own social controls (encouragement, praise, material rewards; or, criticism, social censure, rejection and physical punishment) also militated against bad behavioral contagion and strengthened good behavioral contagion. 

Finally, it is now increasingly clear that genetics is a very important factor in the inheritance of tendencies towards a host of diseases, both physical and psychological; as well as a number of personality features that often produce maladaptive behaviors in individuals. 

All of this provides fodder for the behavioral contagion of bad or good outcomes for individuals, culture and society. 

Perhaps you are beginning to understand that psychology is one of our most important sciences and technologies for future human social and political survival. 

Finally, please note that all levels of America’s governments have been suppressing the power of Judeo/Christian influences. Also, our corrupt governments  have been legalizing the behaviors that were formerly labeled as sinful and illegal. Governments are doing this in order to augment their tragically depleted revenues. Governmental revenues horrifically depleted by unprincipled spending designed to secure a dependent electorate dedicated to furthering politician’s personal wealth and political power. 

Sex robots are perfect technological symbols of secular post-modern nations now in steep decline.

Will America be one of these?

V. Thomas Mawhinney, Ph.D.

Health Services Provider in Psychology

Professor Emeritus of Psychology, Indiana University South Bend

 

For more “Big Picture” thinking, I invite you to study two of my professional publications below. There I detail a few (just a few) of the determinants of human behavior, cultural evolution and potentially the rise and decline of civilizations.

Also, you undoubtedly note that I have not specified what is good or bad behavior, or good and bad behavioral contagion. I invite you to think about your own value judgments about these matters. However, I ask that you put these judgments within the context of the biopsychosocial laws and principles discussed in this blog. If you wish to know my own thoughts on this difficult matter, you will find them in my publications below.  

http://uncommonculture.org/ojs/index.php/bsi/article/view/328

https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=zKtoOt2Vvb8C&oi=fnd&pg=PA45&dq=behavioral+contagion+of+gambling+v.t.+mawhinney&ots=F8rOYqs1Or&sig=e07hs19rcrN6pIPXg1QEw4D8KsQ#v=onepage&q=behavioral%20contagion%20of%20gambling%20v.t.%20mawhinney&f=false

 

 

Maybe Darwin was Onto Something!

March 18, 2018

Maybe Darwin Was Onto Something!

Yes, I am grinning.

But let’s not forget psychology’s premier Law of Effect: Which states that consequences control behavior. 

Actually, the Law of Effect can influence more that just behavior. Of course it is intimately involved in determining an individual’s behavior. But it is also a major force in shaping species’ biological make-up and behavior patterns, as well as the evolution of human cultures.

Please go to my upper right-side search box on this page for a more detailed explanation of the wide-ranging influences of the Law of Effect. Type “Consequences Control” in the box and press enter.

While scientists look for the “missing link”, here is an excellent example of how the environment can shape bipedal behavior in a biologically exceptional primate.

Gorilla’s can, but normally do not walk on two feet very much.

Perhaps the big guy in the video below, who primarily walks on two feet, is an approximation of one of our great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great grandpas!

By-the-way, he is not as dumb as some might think he looks.

O.K. now, please do not be offended. Maybe you won’t buy-into my line of analysis. But just remember: “The Lord works in mysterious ways.”

The video and article below could suggest that a specie, normally running around on all fours, might produce a few members with a unique physiology (perhaps a very rare helpful genetic mutation), yielding somewhat differently configured brains and/or bodies that facilitate comfortably efficient bipedal movement.

The next step would be for these creatures to discover that they can gather more food, run, intimidate, fight, and attract members of the opposite sex; or maybe care for their babies more effectively on two feet, than can others in their clan stuck walking  primarily on four feet.

He or she would not understand that by walking on two feet their hands would tend to be cleaner, thus making them less prone to infections than others in their tribe. The discovery of germ theory would come much later in the evolution of an associated much smarter (though often self-defeating) lineage of self-named “homosapiens”.

By assembling the pieces of this interesting puzzle, we construct an individual who will be better fed, bigger, stronger, more intimidating, healthier and perhaps more attractive to the opposite sex.

Presumably, therefore they will be able to make more babies and more successfully pass this helpful mutation on to future generations than their competitors still hopping around on all fours.

http://www.phillyvoice.com/philadelphia-zoo-gorilla-prefers-walk-around-human/

V. Thomas Mawhinney, Ph.D., 3/18/18

Fixing A Corrupt Congress: Term-Limits #1b

September 9, 2016

Fixing America’s Corrupt Congress: Term-Limits #1b

The title of this first blog on Term Limits asserts that Term-Limits are an important partial cure for  a Corrupt American Congress.

In order move to assertion # 2 in the title, that Term-Limits are a fix, it is important to provide evidence of assertion #1, that our Congress is corrupt.

I am a psychologist, not a political scientist. Therefore I will draw heavily on the writings of those who are experts on this matter and also the intricate workings of our complex government that are shaped by the various financial, political and social influences that forcefully impinge upon it.

As a psychologist, I was taught that there is no such thing as human nature. After 36 years a professor and concurrent practicing psychologist, I must assert that there definitely is something that deserves to be called “human nature”. The thoughts, perceptions, emotions and behaviors of human-beings are heavily determined by the Laws and Principles of Psychology. Of these, there are too many to discuss in this context. However, it is our characteristic great susceptibility to these influences that I view as human nature.

Any modern Introductory College Psychology Textbook will help establish the validity of what I am stating. We now know more about the determinants of our own behavior than ever before and most of our population, including those who serve in our governments are ignorant of what makes all of us behave as we do.

With regard to the application of principles of psychology to the design of a better socioculture, we remain in a primitive state.

What is considered by many psychologists as the premier Law of psychology, constantly shaping human behavior, is the “Law of Effect”. This law can be simply stated: “consequences control behavior”. 

Speaking non-technically, the lack of rewards; the presence of rewards; or the presence of punishments following various human behaviors will influence the future probability (frequency, or rate of occurrence) of our behaviors. When we behave in certain ways and we are not rewarded, these behaviors tend to occur less frequently. When we behave in certain ways and we are rewarded, these behaviors occur with increased frequency. When we do certain things and our actions are followed by punishment, we tend to do these things less often.

Such changes in our behaviors are not perfectly certain to occur, in all individuals, under all circumstances. But statistically speaking, among our species, they are very likely to occur the ways that the science of psychology can easily predict.

There is much more to this picture, but the Law of Effect and its many influences upon everyone is a great place to start.

Corruption can be defined as dishonest or fraudulent conduct by those in power, normally involving some form of bribery to behave in unethical or illegal ways.

I know of no statistics on this matter. But, I am confident that there are many highly principled people who are very hard to corrupt. However, based upon my 55 years of adult observations (since 20 years of age), a great  many humans are easily corrupted. Furthermore, many citizens who live apparently moral and ethical lives have long been corrupted, but skillfully disguised this fact.

Now to the point: The politics of Congress (and politics in general) have evolved into a system of rewards and non-rewards, with very few punishments for bad behavior, that bring powerful corrupting forces to bear upon all of our elected servants. Of course, these forces have always been present. However, for many reasons, they have increased in both frequency of occurrence and magnitude in recent times. The result is, predictably, an increase in frequency and magnitude of corruption among our politicians.

Too many in Congress are strongly shaped into dishonest and/or fraudulent behavior patterns by those who have the power to reward them with glory and fame, political longevity, sexual favors, money, blocks of voters, lucrative consulting or business opportunities, and the ability to vote themselves various privileges, comforts, and recreational rewards, etc..

The recent actions of American politicians in-and-out of Congress should be enough to confirm my observations. However, if you are a skeptic please consider the following, which predates many of our more current examples of political corruption flooding the media.

http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/5432:license-to-profit-legalized-corruption-in-the-us-congress

At the end of this blog is the URL for an entire article that I will draw upon for short authoritative quotes in my series of blogs on this topic. I hope you will read this article in its entirety when you have the time.

Fixing America’s problems with political corruption will require the imposition of  Term-Limits.

The following is quoted from, Term Limits: The Only Way to Clean Up Congress, by Dan Greenberg of the Heritage Foundation.

________________________________________________________________________________________

Argument #1: Term limits are undemocratic.

Perhaps the most popular argument against term limits is that they restrict the choices available to voters. Voters, say opponents, should be able to vote for as wide a field of candidates as possible. Additionally, the ballot box makes statutory term limits unnecessary. “In effect, there are term limits in place every two years — candidates have to go before constituents and get reelected,” says Jeff Biggs, press secretary for House Speaker Tom Foley. (Debbie Howlett, “Speaker Foley Challenges Home State Term Limit,” USA Today, June 8, 1993, p. 8A.) But arguments that term limits are undemocratic because they restrict voters’ choices run into two problems: (1) the tremendous electoral advantages enjoyed by incumbents make it difficult to argue that the elections they win are truly democratic, and (2) term limits would be more likely to expand the field of candidates than to restrict it.

Because the perquisites of office present huge barriers to entry by challengers, incumbents always have the privilege of fighting a defensive war. Taxpayer-funded benefits like franking, staff, and travel allowances tilt the field in incumbents’ favor, and political donors — who typically view their contribution as wasted if it does not go to the winning candidate — magnify these incumbent advantages by disproportionately favoring candidates already in office. In 1992, House challengers raised 28 cents for every campaign dollar received by incumbents, while Senate challengers raised 47 cents. (Ornstein, Mann, and Malbin, Vital Statistics on Congress 1993-1994, p. 81, table 3-5.) Challengers’ donations relative to those of incumbents have been dwindling more or less steadily since 1980. It is no wonder that challengers facing such long odds routinely lose to incumbents over 90 percent of the time.

Term limits will likely end incumbents’ traditional ability to insulate congressional elections from true competition. In fact, experience at the state level suggests that voter choice actually is increased by term limits. In California, for instance, the imposition of state-level term limits in 1990 led to a 1992 increase of over 25 percent in candidate filings for the state senate and over 50 percent for the state assembly; senate candidate filings for 1994 reflect yet another increase, and while assembly candidate filings have dropped from 1992, they remain 15 percent higher than they were in 1990. Although the limits do not take effect until 1996, they have encouraged some incumbents to find other work before they were forced to do so. (Armor, op. cit.)

Term limits also would ensure regular opportunities for candidates’ political advancement. For instance, when George Mitchell announced his retirement from the U.S. Senate, candidates in Maine attempted advances at all levels of government. There were “city council members running for state representative, state representatives running for the state senate, state senators running for Congress, and United States representatives running for the Senate.” (“Mitchell’s Decision Not to Run Sets Off a Statewide Scramble in Maine,” The New York Times, June 16, 1994, p. A24.)

By creating more choices for voters, increased filings like those in Maine and California aid democracy. Nationwide, congressional term limits likewise will create more choices for voters, more competitive elections, and more democracy.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

Quote Source:

http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/1994/08/bg994nbsp-term-limitsnbsp-the-only-way

V. Thomas Mawhinney, Ph.D., 9/9/16

Illegals “Surge” Over Border After Talk of Amnesty

November 25, 2014

Illegals “Surge” Over Border After Talk Of Amnesty

Who could have predicted this!?  Duhh…..

Only those with an ounce of common sense.

Common sense backed-up by the science of psychology. The science that our government is using against when ever they can.

How about Law of Effect? “Consequences Control Behavior”! How about almost all of the rewards of living in America for simply walking or swimming across our open boarders? All of this compared to the greatly deprived conditions in their homelands.

How about Social Learning Theory’s Modeling, Imitation and Vicarious Learning? People imitate others (models) when they see that the others’ particular behaviors being positively reinforced (roughly speaking, rewarded).

And there is more, but that is for another time.

See the documentation below:

http://townhall.com/tipsheet/katiepavlich/2014/11/24/surprise-after-obama-announces-legalization-plan-border-crossings-surge-n1923104

V. Thomas Mawhinney, Ph.D., 11/25/14

Modern Welfare: Differential Reinforcement of Dependent Behavior

March 20, 2014

Modern Welfare: Differential Reinforcement of Dependent Behavior

As a practicing psychologist I commonly encounter clients who are on various welfare programs. Many, not all, are certain to remain on welfare for a very long time…even a life-time.

Many need this support, some could get schooling and eventually work (but most just talk about it), a few are blatantly scamming the welfare system and working tax payers.

When any society gives people significant amounts of money and other material benefits for doing nothing, the Laws and Principles of Psychology dictate that increasing proportions of the population will become dependent upon such hand-outs. In more technical terms if you provide individuals with positive reinforcement contingent upon doing nothing, they will learn to do nothing…other than engage in frivolous forms of self-stimulation and become dependent upon governmental “non-contingent” reinforcement.

You may wish to see an earlier blog that I did on this topic: “Don’t Feed the Animals: It Will Make Them Dependent”.  https://culturalsurvivalskills.wordpress.com/2014/01/23/dont-feed-the-animals-it-will-make-them-dependent/

A recent report by the Cato Institute has demonstrated, that in many states, those who receive full welfare benefits will actually make more than those working for minimum wage. Even for those who do not make more than those who work, the additional hassles and costs (child care, clothes, transportation, and inconvenience), make it likely that they will choose to remain on welfare and not go to work.

The 1996 work-requirements that became a part of America’s welfare system has generally become increasingly lenient with many exemptions now available. The results of this administrative back-sliding are perfectly predictable.

Psychology’s Law of Effect states that consequences control behavior…What more do you need to know?

The following Cato Institute article is short and clear. I hope you will read it  and it on to others.

http://www.cato.org/publications/commentary/when-welfare-pays-better-work

VTM,  3/20/14

P.S. Thanks to Lee Hornack for informing me of this article.

I Wonder If I Am A Libertarian # 8

July 2, 2013

Key Concepts of Libertarianism

By

David Boaz

January 1, 1999

Quote:

The key concepts of libertarianism have developed over many centuries. The first inklings of them can be found in ancient China, Greece, and Israel; they began to be developed into something resembling modern libertarian philosophy in the work of such seventeenth- and eighteenth-century thinkers as John Locke, David Hume, Adam Smith, Thomas Jefferson, and Thomas Paine.

The Virtue of Production. Much of the impetus for libertarianism in the seventeenth century was a reaction against monarchs and aristocrats who lived off the productive labor of other people. Libertarians defended the right of people to keep the fruits of their labor. This effort developed into a respect for the dignity of work and production and especially for the growing middle class, who were looked down upon by aristocrats. Libertarians developed a pre-Marxist class analysis that divided society into two basic classes: those who produced wealth and those who took it by force from others. Thomas Paine, for instance, wrote, “There are two distinct classes of men in the nation, those who pay taxes, and those who receive and live upon the taxes.” Similarly, Jefferson wrote in 1824, “We have more machinery of government than is necessary, too many parasites living on the labor of the industrious.” Modern libertarians defend the right of productive people to keep what they earn, against a new class of politicians and bureaucrats who would seize their earnings to transfer them to nonproducers.

End of Quote:

This quote contains a useful political science history lesson.

As a psychologist, I cannot help but think of the Law of Effect. It states flatly that consequences control behavior. For example, when the take taxes from responsible and productive people and given them to those who are irresponsible and unproductive, we get a growing underclass of irresponsible and unproductive citizens.

It is amazingly ignorant that the voting public cannot see this. It is devious and criminal that liberal/progressive politicians knowingly feed this growing underclass of irresponsible and unproductive voters in order to secure their political futures.

While cultural evolution can be stunningly complex, this destructive practice is one simple, but major, force driving America’s cultural decline.

Wake-Up America!

V. Thomas Mawhinney,  Ph.D.

7/2/13

The Psychology of Morality: Religion vs Atheism

January 20, 2012

The Psychology of Morality: Religion vs Atheism

There are clear reasons why secular-based moral behavior is likely to be weaker than religiously based moral behavior.

Psychologists know, and generally teach their students that immediate consequences (reinforcement and punishment) most powerfully influence behavior. However, Dr. Richard Malott (A professor of psychology at Western Michigan University) has made a special exception to that rule for humans who have mastered the use of language and who can well experience, read about and hear about the past, present. Humans can also imagine, or be informed of future probable events, and they can estimate the size and impact of those consequences for themselves and others.

Professor Malott observes (and so can you), that immediate consequences that are small and not certain are not so likely to influence our behavior. Familiar examples of this weak control would be wearing a seat belt to avoid injury in case of an automobile collision, exercising regularly to avoid a host of possible health difficulties, or brushing our teeth three times a day to avoid cavities, etc..

The control of our behavior is much more powerful when consequences that are delayed, are also very large and very certain. We would be unlikely to attempt to fly to airplane to a destination if we did not know, for certain, that we had enough fuel to arrive safely. A mariner would most likely avoid voyaging in the direction of a developing hurricane.

Of course immediate, large, and very certain consequences control our behavior best. Humans normally avoid stepping in front of a speeding automobile, walking of cliffs, and petting rattle snakes.

But more to the point, for those who believe in God, both immediate cognitive-emotional (guilty thoughts and feelings), social (social disapproval) consequences;  and delayed spiritual consequences (Heaven or Hell) related to moral and immoral behavior can be very big, and very certain .

For non believers, there are no spiritual consequences. Furthermore secular social consequences are often small, delayed, and improbable for religiously based moral prescriptions (tell the truth, treat others kindly, don’t steal, etc.).

On the other hand immoral behavior earns relatively immediate, large, and certain physiological reinforcement (pornography and sex = novel stimulation and orgasm, ingestion of drugs and alcohol = reduced anxiety and rewarding changes in states of consciousness, Gambling and violence = physiological excitement and dominance). Furthermore, individuals  will easily find social contexts in which to behave in immoral ways and gain positive reinforcement from others.

To the believer, “the wages of sin is death”. To the secularist humanist, all too often, the wages of sin are more immediate, larger and more certain reinforcement.

 

V. Thomas Mawhinney, Ph.D.,  1/20/12

God’s Psychology

December 20, 2011

God’s Psychology

From my psychological perspective (human conditioning and learning), what causes people to conform to religiously based moral values and conduct are the associations and consequences that deviation from, or conformity to, those values produce for them. Yes, the psychological Principles of Associationism and the Law Of Effect strongly influence our spiritual/religious lives.

A belief in God’s rewards of everlasting life in Heaven and the fearful specter of everlasting Hell are supported by the social consequences that religious organizations and other believers provide to those who do, or do not, conform to God’s moral Laws. The social environment plays a critical role in the degree to which members of any population conform to the prescriptions of a religion, and its moral code.

For those who believe in their God, their learned feelings of love, happiness and security; or fear, anxiety, and guilt are related to their history of learning while growing-up among teaching families and others. These feelings, beliefs and ways of thinking are similar to the those concepts of God and His Words. These strong emotional byproducts of learning  can then exert strong control of a persons actions.

When the Word of God and associated emotions have been directly taught in families and the related religious beliefs and moral codes are augmented by the church leaders, a large church family, the community and the media, they are likely to remain strong. When these influences diminish, or they actually turn against these teachings, faith in God and its resulting morality will also diminish.

Beware, the barbarians are coming…..and they are increasingly us.

Wake-Up America!

V. Thomas Mawhinney, Ph.D.     12/20/11

Your Tax Dollars At Work!

October 20, 2011

Your Tax Dollars At Work!

You absolutely must see this video. Please do not fail to educate yourself, your cultures survival depends upon us controlling what our government does with our tax dollars.

This is any damn fool’s opportunity to call me a racist. Never mind that not long ago, in a therapy session, two white people told me they were doing essentially the same thing.

Misguided socialism, misguided governmental largess, misguided entitlements, “free money”, or anything else that you wish to call the giving of positive reinforcers for crazy talk, lying, cheating, and doing nothing, will reliably create exactly what you will see in this video. And it will do it to every single race on earth because all races are human animals and all animals respond to psychology’s Law of Effect (consequences control behavior) in the same way.

In this regard, color changes to the human animal are irrelevant.

http://revolutionarypolitics.tv/video/viewVideo.php?video_id=15915

V. Thomas Mawhinney, Ph.D. , 10/20/11

P.S. Thanks so much to Joe Grunert for sending me this video.

Influencing Behavior: Rewarding Consequences and Values

January 27, 2011

Influencing Behavior: Rewarding Consequences and Values

Thanks to Bruce Bryner for sending this wonderful video collection to me.  It best illustrates that human behavior is controlled by consequences. This is one  of psychology’s major Laws. It further illustrates that using rewards (positive reinforcers as consequences for behavior that we wish to see happen more often in the future is the way to go).

Beyond this, the traffic control videos show that for some behaviors, a combination of punishment for infractions and rewards for compliance are needed. It should be known that the over-use of punishment without strong rewards for incompatible behavior normally has bad outcomes for the punished and the punisher.

Finally, all tapes illustrate that to implement systematic consequences that will influence behaviors in desirable ways, it is necessary for groups or sociocultures to organize themselves around common values and morals (i.e., it is good to follow speed limits it is bad to speed; it is good to put trash in its proper receptacles; it is bad to pollute the environment; etc.).

Want some fun?

What to see some ways to help ourselves behave better by having fun?

Watch the following videos.

http://thefuntheory.com/

V. Thomas Mawhinney, Ph.D.


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