When Robert Told Me About Doomsday


When Robert Told Me About Doomsday

I remember siting on the back steps of my parents second story apartment, when I was around seven years old. I was sitting with my slightly older friend, Robert. It was then that he told me something that was, at that time in my life, stunning and inconceivable.

Robert told me that the world would end someday. He called it Doomsday.

I could not believe it.

Mom told me it was true, but I did not have to worry because it would not happen for a very long time.

Do you remember the day that you learned that the earth and everything you knew about would come to an end?

Seven decades later, I have come to understand that indeed, nothing stays the same and nothing lasts forever.  Steady states in nature are an illusion, and so it is with you and me and all living and inanimate things.

Scientists tell us that our world is not likely to end for a very long time. However, they also warn us of Meteors that could strike us with devastating results. Although there is no real security in life, we naturally tend to not worry about frightening events that are very improbable or that will not likely occur within our own life-spans

It is easy to suppress, purposefully “forget”, not-think-about, or overlook such uncomfortable information and that is exactly what I did until I was approximately 35 years old.

Then, I began to think about something just as fearsome to me and much more likely to occur in the nearer future. It was not the world’s doomsday. It was America’s Doomsday.

While teaching psychology at the college level and working in my private practice, I was confronted with a reality just as shocking as the one that Robert confronted me with when I was a child.

This time It was my stunning observation that the culture that I had grown-up in and loved was in rapid decline and heading toward the dust bin of history.

At first I was skeptical. My training in science alerted me to the fact that in my private practice I was interacting with an unrepresentative sample of our population. After all, so-called normal and happy people do not seek psychological treatment. Unless, of course, they are in a relationship with someone (children, spouses, or lovers, etc., who are not so normal and happy—-which is often the case).

Sadly, a few hours in a university library confirmed that the rates of population bad and emotionally troubled behaviors had doubled and some even tripled over the past several decades. Also, my study of our various economic trends clearly foreshadowed the great economic problems we now suffer. At that time (circa 1985) no one could conceive of our current 17 trillion-dollar deficit.

It was not difficult to see some of the reasons why this had happened. The Laws of psychology  embodied within this nation’s changing political/cultural metacontingencies  (governmental rule changes of rewards and punishments) clearly predicted the population behavioral changes that were unfolding before my eyes.

As I began to write and speak about The Psychology of America’s Decline, very few people accepted this reality and my data-based analyses. I should not have been surprised.

As with the world’s doomsday, people naturally suppress other fearful events that they feel will not happen in their life-times and also ones over-which they feel they have no control. To compound the problem, each generation perceives their cultural experiences as normal and few think about and understand the dramatic changes in their culture over times beyond their own.

History suggests that great societies approximately 250 years before they decline.

In his important book, Immoderate Greatness: Why Civilizations Fail, author William Ophuls writes the following:

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The process is insidious. Limits constrict by degrees. Decay creeps in unnoticed. It is only late in the game—usually too late to do much about it—that those living become aware of a gradual and imperceptible transformation that has rendered the civilization increasingly tired, depleted, impoverished, vulnerable, and ineffectual.” (Kindle Location, 153)

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“At last comes the implosion, as the ‘stupendous fabric’ of an overstretched, hollowed-out, and corrupt civilization yields ‘to the pressure of its own weight’. A barbarian invasion, a terrible plague, a devastating drought, a calamitous war, or some similar disaster is usually only the precipitation factor—-the final push that causes the structure to topple. ‘A great civilization is not conquered from without until it has destroyed itself from within,’ said Will Durant.” (Kindle Location, 167-173)

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Once upon a time Robert told Tommy. Now Tommy is telling you.

Wake-Up America!

VTM, 9/14/13

P.S. for a more in-depth understanding of the metacontingencies that are destroying America, simply type that term into my search box and click return.

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One Response to “When Robert Told Me About Doomsday”

  1. Rafael Bouldin Says:

    I’d incessantly want to be update on new articles on this site, saved to fav! .

    Like

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